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20121201
20121201
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
and back to the point we were talking about, the negotiations in washingtons. the at some point, somebody, maybe the republicans have to speak up ab defend the real economy against the sort of policies they're talking about down there. >> they get wrapped up in the insider baseball and we're guilty of that, too, and playing to that and people out there. what they really want to know is the economy going to grow or not. if you're increasing taxes on dividend, you get less capital and dividends and then less growth for the economy and less revenue for the government. >> well, a lot of people worry about the many years that japan has been in a slow growth environment, but they've kept interest rates very low in japan, but the problem is, government is too big. that's why japan has not been able to start growing again. and this is the path that the u.s. is certainly on if we don't change that dynamic. >> paul: kim, is there any recognition about this in washington or is it all -- i mean, do you hear any of this discussion or do they really believe, certainly, the white house and the treasury,
, murdered in these streets. the videotape beating of derrion, an honor student, brought washington bigwigs here today but is anyone paying enough attention to what's happening to our kids? >> we have gone to chicago a number of times over the last several years to report on this violence. if this violence was happening in other parts of the united states, many critics say it would be getting a lot more attention. >> part of our ongoing coverage of chicago's gun violence has been to look at what's being done to stop it. which brings us to tonight's report. with killings on the rise, illinois's governor, pat quinn, launched an ambitious anti-violence program two years ago called the neighborhood recovery initiative. on paper it sounded like a great idea and it really did catch our eye. and then we investigated and the cnn investigation found some pretty serious questions about whether this was crime prevention or good old-fashioned politics. here's investigative correspondent drew griffin. >> reporter: hello? hello? anybody here? this is one of the community organizing groups hired to help r
, and there are two types of people in washington. those who really enjoy detailed discussion about senate procedure, and those who don't. welcome. i can see which category you fit into. we have a great panel today to discuss something that's become more and more important moving forward, especially in the current nature of congress where the lines seem to be more and more stark and obvious than as any time as i've been in washington. we have four experts discussing the developments in --cepsbly the filibuster, but the discussion will touch on other areas of senate procedure and precedent, and you'll see a distinction between the two, senate rules and senate precedence on the other. you'll hear from four individuals who have a depth of experience in these matters that, i think, is unrivaled in the city. i'll introduce them briefly so they can turn it over to the discussion. i'll lead off with no particular order, james walden speaking first, working in the house of representatives and the senate, serving as the senate hearing committee. he's an adjunct professor in the department of politics in the
, twitter.com/booktv. >>> and now joining us on booktv is an old washington hand and that is ambassador stewart. he's an author, the future of jews is the name of the book. ambassador, why are you writing a book about the future of the jews? >> we have survived 3,000 years of calamityies and we survived and leave thrived and contributed to societies even those that didn't want us. now we have a whole new set of 21st century challenges, and the question is having survived those terrible times, can we now survive prosperity, success, and integration? and i look at this from two perspective, the global forces that affect america, american jews, and israel, everything from the shift of power to united states and the west to china and the east hours of globalization in the digital era. how to deal with the 1.6 muslims in the world, the threat of iranian nuclear power, and i also look at internal threats, low birthrates, assimilation, and again, whether we can, in effect, succeed at the time when we are more successful than ever in being integrated to our society. it's a new know mom that. --
this weekend. a nasty mix of rain, wind, and snow pummeling northern california, oregon, and washington. the national weather service predicts soaking rain and wind gusts that could hit 70 miles per hour in some places. that could trigger flooding and mudslides after spring fires that destroyed whole forests. >>> and a professor hopes to get a few extra students in his statistic s class. he ends up with 54,000 new kids. luckily, he didn't need a classroom for all of them. >> palestinians celebrate in the west bank after an historic vote at the united nations. my guess says it's a game changer. i'll talk to the first woman elected to the palestinian legislative council. shopping for medicare coverage? don't wait. open enrollment ends december 7th. now's the time to take action. call unitedhealthcare today. celebrations after palestinians win a vote at the united nations. it's a vote that gives them a state up grade and is being seen as a possible step towards official statehood. it had been planned before eight days of fighting erupted in gaza. 138 countries voted yes. 41 abstained. only
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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